Sæglópur
۞ swalker(s)

You see, I don’t wish to be anyone else, alive or dead. I wish to be myself with this poisoned blood, infected thoughts and clogged up brain. Though I truly wish to be somewhere far away from here -my heart knows damn well where that is-, and get to become whatever that’s deep inside me (and that I know shines bright) someday.

3 days
links  faq  message 
Anonym: 42, 51, 53 c:

42. Did you hug/kiss one of your parents today?

  • Yes, I make a point to hug my parents a lot, even (and specially) when I’m pissed at them. I’ve found it has improved our relationship a lot. I’d always been bitter and cold towards them, but it had more to do with my inability to show affection and cope with emotions in general + teenage angst, I guess. So even when it does not come naturally to me (I’m not a touchy feely person) I try to remind myself to do it often. It’s worked wonders for us,contributed to stabilise our relationship and make my time at home much more enjoyable. They can’t stay mad that long this way!

51. Last time you got a portrait taken by a photographer?

  • Sometime mid June, passport sized photographs. Terrible. No earrings, no make up, no smiling, hair away from your face, both ears visible, looking upwards-ish. I look awful.

53. Is Christmas stressful?

  • As hell. There’s too many reasons for it to be. Family reunions, dressing to impress, overwhelming amounts of food, seeing distant relatives, it means another year is coming —you start to think about what you did, and most importantly, what you didn’t do—, it’s hot as hell and I can’t stand heat (in Chile at least, because it’s summer during that time)… Mostly though, because I have terrible memories. My eating would always get terrible during Christmas. x
Anonym: 18. The last time you felt broken? 19. Have you had sex today?
  • Completely and inexorably? I think by the end of February. After that I’ve had some mini breakdowns but I’ve learned to deal. I’ve been feeling pretty anxious lately though. 
  • Nope.

blackpaint20:

Nudes in the Louvre!

Mimesis in the Louvre: 

Mimesis (Ancient Greek: μίμησις (mīmēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mīmeisthai), “to imitate,” from μῖμος (mimos), “imitator, actor”) is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of meanings, which include imitation, representation, mimicry, imitatio, receptivity, nonsensuous similarity, the act of resembling, the act of expression, and the presentation of the self  - wiki

I’d love to try this

blackpaint20:

Nudes in the Louvre!
Mimesis in the Louvre: 
Mimesis (Ancient Greek: μίμησις (mīmēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mīmeisthai), “to imitate,” from μῖμος (mimos), “imitator, actor”) is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of meanings, which include imitation, representation, mimicry, imitatio, receptivity, nonsensuous similarity, the act of resembling, the act of expression, and the presentation of the self  - wiki
I’d love to try this

assureera replied to your post: Where’s my anon then?

Maybe we could distract each other then.

Okay. We should.

stillimpressed:

MOMA  NYC
excdus:

Confetti Landscape #10
Yigal Pardo
Tagged: (~)

massurban:

The Atlantic Cities:

Communities Aren’t Just Places, They’re Social Networks.

Richard Florida. Oct 25, 2012.

Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets — roads and bridges, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes — working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected City, cities are made up of human social networks. Neal took time to discuss his book and research with Atlantic Cities, explaining how cities work as living organisms and why what happens in Las Vegas cannot stay in Las Vegas.

RF: In the book, you write that “communities are networks, not places.” Tell us about why and how networks matter to cities?

ZN: We often think of communities in place–based terms, like Jane Jacobs’ beloved Greenwich Village. But, whether or not a place like Greenwich Village is really a community has more to do with the residents’ relationships with one another — their social networks – than with where they happen to live or work. The danger of thinking about communities as places is that it can lead us to find communities where they don’t exist.  A neighborhood where the residents never interact is merely a place, but hardly a community. This can lead us to overlook communities that are not rooted in particular places, like a book club with a constantly changing venue.

Communities aren’t disappearing, but to find them we need to stop looking in places, and start looking in social networks.”

Image: easyshutter /Shutterstock

massurban:

The Atlantic Cities:
Communities Aren’t Just Places, They’re Social Networks.
Richard Florida. Oct 25, 2012.
Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets — roads and bridges, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes — working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected City, cities are made up of human social networks. Neal took time to discuss his book and research with Atlantic Cities, explaining how cities work as living organisms and why what happens in Las Vegas cannot stay in Las Vegas.
RF: In the book, you write that “communities are networks, not places.” Tell us about why and how networks matter to cities?

ZN: We often think of communities in place–based terms, like Jane Jacobs’ beloved Greenwich Village. But, whether or not a place like Greenwich Village is really a community has more to do with the residents’ relationships with one another — their social networks – than with where they happen to live or work. The danger of thinking about communities as places is that it can lead us to find communities where they don’t exist.  A neighborhood where the residents never interact is merely a place, but hardly a community. This can lead us to overlook communities that are not rooted in particular places, like a book club with a constantly changing venue.
Communities aren’t disappearing, but to find them we need to stop looking in places, and start looking in social networks.”
Image: easyshutter /Shutterstock